The Ferrari Killler…

tesla-roadster-side-viewTesla pulled a “just one more thing” at their Tesla Semi Truck event and it looks amazing – the Tesla Roadster 2.0. I’m calling it 2.0 since the very first Tesla car was a sports car and it was called a Roadster as well.

Overnight Tesla has put every hyper/super/exotic sports car manufacturer on notice. The Roadster 2.0 is beautiful and the specs are industry leading, 0 to 60 MPH in 1.9 seconds is the fastest production car EVER. I’m a hugh car fan and if I had to put down $250,000 for a Tesla Roadster 2.0 or a Ferrari 488 Spider, I would lean towards the Tesla. And that is saying a lot. If you were to ask me my top 3 car picks, they would be:

  1. Ferrari 488 Spider
  2. Porsche 911 Targa
  3. Mercedes Benz AMG E63 S

Even knowing the history of Ferrari with it’s strong racing culture and it’s exclusiveness, I would still lean towards the Tesla. To hear the engine rev or hear the exhaust note of the Ferrari 488 gets me excited every time I hear one, yet I would still leans towards Tesla. Granted I would have to see the final production version of the Tesla Roadster 2.0 but having seen other Tesla products I’m pretty sure the Roadster 2.0 is the real deal.

Ferrari and every other hyper/super/exotic sports car manufacturer is in a typical innovator’s dilemma. They stick to what they know and yet what they know is being disrupted yet they still cling to the past. The internal combustion engine (ICE) is going the way of the dinosaur and the only place to see those cars in the future will be in museums.

For the past 20 years car manufacturers have been in an arms race to shove the biggest ICE into the engine bay and get higher and higher HP (horsepower) numbers. When I bought my first car in 1996, it was a Nissan Maxima SE and it had a 190 HP engine and at that time that was a big deal for a 4 door sedan. Today, that same Maxima carries a 300 HP engine. I’m guessing most consumers don’t care about those numbers and that’s the issue, the industry is changing. Yet, someone forget to tell the big automakers about this structural shift that is happening.

If I were a shareholder of Ferrari, which is listed on the Nasdaq under the ticker symbol – RACE, I would be worried. Ferrari has capped the number of cars they produce in a year to make sure they don’t flood the market but at some point, people will no longer want ICE cars. Time and time again they have said they are not looking at EVs (electric vehicles) or SUVs (sport utility vehicle). However, they are starting to change their stance on SUVs and I’m sure sooner or later they will have to push their chips into the pot and say they are all in for EVs.

Tesla is the future just like Ferrari and Porsche were the future in the 60’s and 70’s. Time will tell if Tesla is the winner, but one thing is for sure that EVs are here to stay and are the future.

The Tesla of India?

mahindraA couple of days ago the Mint newspaper published a story about Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) working with Ford to develop an electric sedan. Ford would get the technology to build a low-cost electric vehicle from M&M and in exchange M&M would get technology to build a larger electric vehicle for potentially the Indian market. M&M is part of the Mumbai based Mahindra Group conglomerate which is run by Anand Mahindra.

So you ask what low-cost electric vehicle technology does M&M have? The answer is quite simple – REVA, which it bought in 2010. REVA (Revolutionary Electric Vehicle Alternative) was started in 1994 by Chetan Maini and way before Tesla came to the market and made electric cars cool. REVA has since been renamed to Mahindra Electric and under the M&M umbrella.

When I look at the Indian car manufacturers – Maruti, M&M and Tata Motors. Maruti is a one trick pony – build cheap cars that the masses will buy. This is not a knock on Maruti it’s just their playbook that has made them the #1 car seller in India. Tata Motors which is part of the Tata Group is currently embroiled in corporate strategy indecision and I’m sure they have not clear strategy in place for electric vehicles.

That leaves M&M, which has the best chance of being a leader in the electric vehicle space not only for Indian but other markets located near India. The Mahindra Group over the years has acquired several companies that call help it achieve it’s goal. If you look at Tesla, they are leaders because of 3 things:

  1. Design
  2. Their manufacturing plant in Fremont, California
  3. Battery technology

For design the Mahindra Group bought Pininfarina SpA in 2015. Pininfarina is the legendary Italian design house that has designed most of the Ferrari’s and one of my favorite American cars the Cadillac Allanté. With Pininfarina in-house they have no excuse not to sketch a car that is out of this world.

Tesla recently admitted that building cars is hard and hence behind schedule with their Model 3 builds. M&M has been building cars and trucks for many years and also purchased SsangYong Motors, South Korea’s 4th largest automobile manufacturer. From a manufacturing perspective M&M seems to have their act together since they have been assembling cars and trucks for many decades.

That leaves Mahindra Electric and their battery technology, which really is the main ingredient in an electric car. I’m assuming their technology is not so strong but with the partnership and knowledge sharing with Ford that should all change. With the partnership and acquisitions it looks like the Mahindra Group is leagues ahead of anyone else in India…now they just need to release a product that will wow the world.

The Car Industries Innovator's Dilemma

car-brands2015 was a banner year for automotive sales in the United States. It was officially the best year ever (let me repeat EVER) for them by selling 17.471 million new cars and beating the previous record of 17.402 million cars set back in 2000. Strong demand, cheap gas and sub-prime like lending practices helped achieve this sales record. Now the bad news, this sales trajectory most likely will not continue for years and years.

Car companies have a great opportunity to take the profits from the past several years and invest in new markets. But, will they? In Clay Christen’s book – The Innovator’s Dilemma, he says:

successful companies put too much emphasis on customers’ current needs, and fail to adopt new technology or business models that will meet their customers’ unstated or future needs.

Remember Kodak? They invented the digital camera but never monetized it. They were busy making so much money from the physical camera rolls and the paper that pictures were printed on to think about the future. That attitude did not work out so well for Kodak.

The question is, will car companies innovate or go down the path of Kodak. The car companies business model is getting attacked on multiple fronts from various startups and technology:

  • ride sharing apps – why own a car, when you can share a ride with someone who is going in the same direction as you. With an app, the idea of carpooling with someone is made much easier and simpler.
  • taxi hailing apps – why own a car, when you can use an app to summon a car to take you to a particular destination
  • electric cars – why own a fossil fuel burning car that is horrible for the environment when you can have an electric car. (Granted the electricity still might come from a coal burning plant but over time solar energy might be the source.)
  • self driving cars – why own a car when you can summon a self driving car to pick you up and drop you to your destination. Apartment buildings might buy these for their residents and allow everyone to share.
  • 3D printed parts – Why go to a local dealer or repair shop when you can 3D print the plastic switch that needs to be fixed.

I’m a hugh car fan, but I know that most people just don’t give a damn about their car. For 99% of the the population a car is used to get from point A to point B and for 95% of the time is just a hunk of steel that sits idle. The rise in these new business models that are attacking the car industry are to address the 99% of the population.

The car companies have the money and distribution to change things around. But, it all depends if their management teams have the ability to break-free from their past and get past the innovators dilemma.

 

What happened VW?

vw-dieselgateAbout 4 1/2 years ago I penned an article talking about how the Volkswagen (VW) Group was firing on all cylinders in India. After revealing to US authorities it had been intentionally circumventing emissions standards, all that progress is coming crashing down and it could take down the VW group with it. That’s not hyperbole, what the VW Group has committed is a serious breach of trust. So what happened?

It all started with some scientists from West Virginia University who were testing random vehicles for emissions. They noticed the cars from the VW Group always seemed to spew more emissions in actual driving conditions then when stationary at an emissions testing facility. The numbers were not 5% or 10% off but an order of magnitude that was 15-35 times more then the VW Group said the cars would emit. It finally came to a head on September 15, 2015 and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) got involved by issuing a notice of violation. Surprisingly, the VW Group admitted it was intentionally beating the emissions test by using software to detect if a car was being testing for emissions and then changing various parameters to the get emissions levels much lower.

Although, VW admitted it was at fault it tried to shield itself saying it was “rogue coders” who did it not anyone from the management team. HAHA. The investigation is on-going and no one really knows what happened but I can tell you some “rogue coders” would not be able to pull this off by themselves. Either that or VW is one of the most dysfunctional companies on the planet. VW was on a mission to be the largest car maker in the world and I’m sure the mandate from the CEO was to go big at all costs or go home.

The VW Group should be barred from selling cars in the US for 2-3 years to really make a point that you cannot intentionally circumvent the law for economic gain. This incident is different from GM where people died. That was a design flaw that was covered up for years and they didn’t intentionally set out to design a faulty ignition switch. If VW gets a slap on the wrist I think it will empower more companies to roll the dice and see if they can getaway. For such a reputable company like VW to go down this path is pure sadness for any car person, they have some amazing name plates like Porsche, Lamborghini and Bugatti to name a few.

As far as India is concerned, the cars will probably get the required fix to make the cars compliant for emission standards. But, then that means they probably won’t be as fuel efficient which will open up a whole host of lawsuits for fraud. As far as banning VW cars, I don’t see that as an option as the country really needs those jobs and the tax revenue it generates. Whatever the case may be, their reputation has been damaged and will take a long time to rebuild that trust with consumers.

Dear Ola & Uber, Welcome to the License Raj

Bits-Bytes-CarEveryone from the Bay Area to Bangalore is talking about whether we are in a technology funding bubble or not. I think that misses the bigger question in India of whether the Indian government might have an effect on it. I woke up this morning and saw an article that Vijay Chibber the secretary of the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, has stated that companies like Ola and Uber must be registered with the state government like any other taxi operator. Vijay refers to Section 93 of the Motor Vehicles Act which states that the state governments have jurisdiction.

Ola has raised just under Rs. 6,660 crore in funding and employs thousands of people and that is most likely going to come to a screeching halt if the government has its way. Registering with the government is not the issue but existing taxi’s are registered and it’s pretty clear no one likes the existing system. How many times have people been refused a ride from a taxi driver? How many times has the taxi driver driven like he was in an F1 race? How many times have you stepped into a taxi and the floor board has rotted and you can see through? Yup, I’m sure all of us have faced this issue.

This issue goes back to my disconnect with Modi. He will travel all around the world and meet with enthusiastic entrepreneurs like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Tesla’s Elon Musk but back at home…

Well back at home, we are back to square one with the “license raj” of yesteryear. The central government has punted on the issue and has let each state government frame the guidelines for the taxi app aggregators like Ola and Uber. This just means more work for Ola and Uber in dealing with each state government – oh, what joy for them! And, in states like Maharashtra they may impose a cap on the number of taxi’s that an operator can have, because that’s how we roll in the license raj era. VC funding meet Indian Government regulators, you may have met your match.

 

Automotive Disruption Just Around the Corner

tesla-disruptWhen did the world wake up and take notice of the automotive industry?

5 years ago General Motors (GM) filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy and no one seemed to care, today it’s a completely different story. GM recently announced one of their best quarters ever and has about $25 billion in the bank, yes that’s a “B” for billion. Now everyone is talking about the automotive industry, so much so that the press is speculating that Apple is working on an electric vehicle. The current automotive trends people are talking about are highlighted below and some of the companies involved:

– Self-driving cars (Google X)
– Electric cars (Tesla)
– Ride-sharing (Uber)
– 3D printed cars (Local Motors)

I assume the sudden interest in the car is because it’s such a large industry and when you talk about disruption this is one market that needs it. However, let’s rewind a bit.

The automotive age really kicked off with the introduction of the Ford Model T in 1908 as an affordable car for the middle class. It had 4 wheels and an internal combustion engine. You know what the car still 4 wheels and an internal combustion and that’s the problem. Yes, cars from 1908 look very different from the 2014 models but at the heart of the car is still the fossil fuel gulping internal combustion engine.

The automotive industry’s innovation for the past 10 years has been selling vehicles with more and more horsepower. I can’t for the life of me understand why you need a 400+ horsepower SUV to lug people around. I love cars, but when I speak to most normal humans they view their cars as a way to get from point a to point b. The industry really should have spent their R&D budget on engineering cars that would go further on a tank of gas/petrol instead of focusing on how fast it could drain that tank.

Self-driving cars and ride-sharing services like Uber show that people don’t want to drive. If people could afford a driver/chauffeur they would but most can’t and hence these other options are flourishing.

The aura of the electric car has been elevated 100x with Tesla in the game. Previously, electrics cars were ugly looking and something only a tree hugger could love. But, Tesla changed the game and is quickly moving towards its eventual goal of having an electric 4 door car costing around $40,000. In addition, there are many people working on the ultimate technology that would detach the car from the fossil fuel grid…solar power. Fisker Automotive which recently was bought out of bankruptcy by a Chinese company had a solar panel roof on their cars to power the accessories in the car. As solar cell technology gets more efficient it truly will allow the car to cut the cord to the fossil fuel grid.

For me the most innovative area is 3D printing, imagine you get into an accident and you take your car to the bodyshop to get it fixed. Instead of ordering the fender and having it delivered the next day, they print the rear-quarter panel overnight. Back in the day when GM launched Saturn one of the selling points of the car were the dent resistant body panels. The plastic pellets used to create the body panels were sold by GE Plastics (now called SABIC). In a country like India, all body panels should be made out of these plastic pellets since people get their doors dented and dinged almost on a daily basis. 3D printing of body panels is one thing but Local Motors recently unveiled their fully 3D printed vehicle. The implications of the open source project are far and wide, people can take the Local Motors designs and improve upon it. Who would have guessed that open source would hit the automotive industry.

It’s exciting times ahead for the automotive industry, the question is whether the big automotive companies can quickly capture these trends or continue the status quo. It’s the typical innovator’s dilemma, get with the times or get left behind.

Datsun No-Go Fiasco

datsun-goA couple of weeks ago the Global New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) tested the Maruti-Suzuki Swift and Datsun Go (owned by Nissan), two cars which are sold in India. Most countries have their own automotive standards board like the US has the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), India has the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM). NCAP is an initiative by the United Nations to make cars and roads safer around the world. NCAP usually has stricter norms in countries where big companies can push around the government officials…kinda like India.

So what were the results of the frontal impact tests for the Maruti-Suzuki Swift and Datsun Go? They deemed both cars unfit for Indian roads and sent a letter to the CEO of Nissan, Carlos Ghosn, stating he has no business selling a car that is so unsafe and should immediately stop producing the car.

The outrage in India was pretty much…not there. As expected a spokesperson from SIAM had a quote to justify the abysmal results:

Every country has its own safety requirements. Our cars are meeting safety norms set by the government. The protocol followed by Global NCAP was not designed for India and tests must be conducted based on the conditions here.

Of course, the cars tested were both without airbags and I’m willing to bet those are the most popular variants of those cars. The reality is most people will place money above their own safety in an effort to save money. And that’s the crux of the issue where SIAM is stuck, consumers don’t want to pay for expensive safety features and car manufacturers are just giving consumers what they want. But at some point the government needs to make some hard choices and enforce that ALL cars have a minimum set of safety features. If all cars go up in price by Rs. 30,000 (USD 500) then so be it, at least people will not die needlessly.

The crash reports for both cars are below:

The PDF of the Maruti-Suzuki Swift results.
The PDF of the Datsun Go results.

YouTube clip of the Datsun Go impact test: